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Aristocracy
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Aristocracy

Alternative Title: nobility

Aristocracy, government by a relatively small privileged class or by a minority consisting of those presumed to be best qualified to rule.

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As conceived by the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 bce), aristocracy means the rule of the few—the morally and intellectually superior—governing in the interest of all. Such a form of government differs from the rule of one in the interest of all (monarchy) and the rule of the many in the interest of all (a form of government that Aristotle called polity). Rule by one or the few in the rulers’ own interest is tyranny or oligarchy (or timocracy), respectively, and anarchic mob rule is democracy, as Aristotle used that term.

Because “best qualified to rule” is an evaluative notion, it is difficult to distinguish objectively between aristocratic and oligarchic or timocratic governments. Because a monarchical system has its own aristocracy and because the people generally try to elect those they consider the “best” as their rulers in democracies, an aristocratic element also is present in those regimes. For those reasons, the term aristocracy often is used to mean the ruling upper layer of a stratified group. Thus, the upper ranks of government form the political aristocracy of the state; the stratum of the highest religious dignitaries constitutes the aristocracy of the church; and the richest corporate executives and investors constitute an aristocracy of economic wealth.

The Brahman caste in India, the Spartiates in Sparta, the eupatridae in Athens, the patricians or Optimates in Rome, and the medieval nobility in Europe are various historical examples of the social aristocracy or nobility. Most such social aristocracies both legally and factually have been hereditary aristocracies. Other aristocracies have been nonhereditary and recruited from different strata of the population, such as the upper stratum of the Roman Catholic Church, the ruling aristocracy of elective republics and monarchies, the leaders of scientific and artistic organizations, and certain aristocracies of wealth.

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The distinction between aristocracy of birth and nonhereditary aristocracy is relative, because even in caste societies some low-born persons climb into the higher castes and some high-born persons slide into the lower castes. On the other hand, even in open aristocracies there is a tendency for the upper stratum to become a hereditary group filled mainly by the offspring of aristocratic parents. For example, among millionaires and billionaires living in the United States at the beginning of the 21st century, the percentage born of wealthy parents is notably higher than among American millionaires of the mid-19th century.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Brian Duignan, Senior Editor.
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